Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October, 2011

Harold Camping says that May 21st was just a drill.  The real end of the world comes today, October 21st, and to beat the rush I’m scheduling this the night before, to post at midnight so you don’t miss it.  

“What?” you say, “Everything turns into burnt toast on Friday!  I won’t be around to read a cartoon.  Why are you posting this at all?” 

Irony is a form of humor.  A lot of people don’t get it.

   (See other cartoons by scrolling back to May blogposts.  If you’re still here…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Occupy Wall Street, part V

Trying to continue in the spirit of peaceful protest (with some latitude), I give you the immortal words of the mad prophet Howard Beale from the 1976 movie Network (Peter Finch, Faye Dunaway).

Who can forget Beale’s on-air rant, “I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take it anymore!”

Enjoy this classic four-minute scene.   It suits the occasion.

.

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

.

Today, noon, Village Green, Bar Harbor.  Behave yourself.

.

Brooklyn Bridge

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Read Full Post »

This song was recorded by The Weavers for their album Goodnight Irene 1949-1953.  Les Rice wrote it.  Pete Seeger, one of The Weavers, recorded it later and performs it to this day.  At 92 he shows no sign of giving up.

In the video below the lyrics you can hear Pete and watch a slide show.  Pure propaganda, but it’s of the peaceful sort and may do us some good. 

Banks of Marble (Les Rice)This is a featured page

 

D ………………. A7………… D
I’ve traveled ’round this country
………… G ………………… D
From shore to shining shore
…. A7 ………………… D
It really makes me wonder
……… A7…………………. D
The things I heard and sawI saw the weary farmer
Ploughing sod and loam
I heard the auction hammer
Just a-knocking down his home………….. D ……………………… G
But the banks are made of marble
…………. A7……………… D
With a guard at every door
…………… D ………………………… G
And the vaults are stuffed with silver
………….. A7………………… D
That the farmer sweated for.

I saw the seamen standing
Idly by the shore
I heard those bosses saying
“Got no work for you no more”

But the banks are made of marble
With a guard at every door
And the vaults are stuffed with silver
That the seamen sweated for.

I’ve seen the weary miner
Scrubbing coal dust from his back
I heard his children crying
“Got no coal to heat the shack”

But the banks are made of marble
With a guard at every door
And the vaults are stuffed with silver
That the miners sweated for.

I’ve seen my brothers working
Throughout this mighty land
I pray we’ll get together
And together make a stand

Then we’ll own those banks of marble
With no guard at any door
And we’ll share those vaults of silver
That the workers sweated for.

 
.

Read Full Post »

With the movement spreading it gets more and more interesting.

As someone with an interest in history, I’m aware that it’s way too soon to attach any great significance to the Occupy Wall Street movement, but I can say that, historically speaking, it’s about time.

The other movement, the so-called Tea Party, bears little resemblance to the spirit of Boston and in my opinion many of those folks would find themselves siding with George III against the struggle for independence.  I’ve been saying all along that the Tea Party has it backwards; they should be protesting those in power, not aiding and abetting them.  Why no truly popular movement?

As I said, it’s about time.

And so, with the movement coming to Our Town (or at least nearby to it) it’s about time I put up a few posts in recognition of the phenomenon, in hope that it truly develops into a peaceful and productive effort.

The protests have already arrived in Portland, and Bangor, and coming soon to neighboring Bar Harbor, Maine.  Not sayin’ I endorse too much too soon, but the demonstration begins Saturday, October 15, noon, Village Green.

Keep it civilized.

I won’t celebrate the cause too much in these posts because it’s quite possible in these early days (if it survives at all) that it may deteriorate into something ugly.  Think French Revolution, for all good intentions.  Think Russian Revolution.  But I do celebrate the First Amendment, and so far the protestors have furthered that cause.

And so I’ll put up a few vignettes—mostly cartoon, or music, maybe a few current event pieces ripped off an unsuspecting internet—trying to put the movement into perspective.  I have already scheduled five to post in the next few days, and time will tell if it deserves any more.

Read Full Post »